OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM

MILITARY ASPECTS

United States military operations were conducted under the codename
Operation Iraqi Freedom. The United Kingdom military operation was named
Operation Telic, and Australia's Operation Falconer. U.S. Senator Jim Bunning
wrote a March 2003 column supporting the invasion, titled "Operation Iraqi
Liberation".

Approximately 100,000 soldiers and marines from the United States, and
26,000 from British, as well as smaller forces from other nations, collectively
called the "Coalition of the Willing," were deployed prior to the invasion primarily
to several staging areas in Kuwait. (The numbers when naval, logistics,
intelligence, and air force personnel are included were 214,000 Americans,
45,000 British, 2,000 Australians and 2,400 Polish.) Plans for opening a second
front in the north were abandoned when Turkey officially refused the use of its
territory for such purposes. Forces also supported Iraqi Kurdish militia troops,
estimated to number upwards of 50,000. Despite the refusal of Turkey, the
Coalition conducted parachute operations in the north and dropped the 173rd
Airborne Brigade, thereby removing the necessity of any approval from Turkey.
(Later on, during the invasion, it was rumored that Turkey itself had sent troops
into the Kurdish part of Iraq.)

The number of Iraqi military personnel prior to the war was uncertain, but was
believed to have been poorly-equipped. The International Institute for Strategic
Studies estimated the armed forces to number 389,000 (army 350,000, navy
2,000, air force 20,000 and air defense 17,000), the paramilitary Fedayeen
Saddam 44,000, and reserves 650,000. Other estimates number the army and
Republican Guard between 280,000 to 350,000 and 50,000 to 80,000,
respectively, and the paramilitary between 20,000 and 40,000. There were an
estimated thirteen infantry divisions, ten mechanized and armored divisions, as
well as some Special Forces units. The Iraqi Air Force and Navy played a
negligible role in the conflict.

The controversy around the war in Iraq has caused two organizations to form:
Vets for Freedom, a pro-war veterans group and Iraq Veterans Against the
War, an anti-Iraq war veterans group.
ALL INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT WAS OBTAINED THROUGH WIKIPEDIA AT www.wikipedia.org